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Thursday, December 17, 2015

Researchers in Israel announced on Thursday that they have discovered a 1,500-year-old marble tablet at the Sea of Galilee which is engraved with Arabic words written in hebrew.

According to The Blaze, the words suggest that the area was once either a Jewish or Jewish-Christian settlement.

The 59-inch long engraved tablet was found at Kursi, where Jesus is believed to have “Miracle of the Swine,” which was when he healed a man possessed by a demon. Jesus drove the demon into a herd of pigs, who then jumped off a cliff into the sea and drowned.

Researchers were able to discover the tablet after the Sea of Galilee’s water level went down.

“Nothing prepared them for the extraordinary discovery,” Haifa University said of the tablet.

Letters

Two of the words on the tablet have been deciphered as “amen” and “marmaria,” which historians believe either refers to marble or the virgin Mary.

“This discovery bolsters the belief which was until now considered folklore that this is the settlement of Kursi which Jesus visited and where he performed ‘the Miracle of the Swine,’” said Michal Artzi of the University of Haifa’s Leon Recanati Institute for Maritime Studies, who directed the research at the site.

“It consists of eight lines, and you usually don’t find so many words in Hebrew letters carved in stone,” Artzi added of the tablet. “The assumption is that whomever the inscription was dedicated to had enormous influence on the local people. There is no other dedication as detailed … among the archaeological discoveries made in Israel up to now.”

Artzi concluded by saying that the tablet was found in a room that is believed to have been in a synagogue.

What do you think about this discovery? Let us know your thoughts in the comments section.

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