viral

Author

Tuesday, February 16, 2016

A major archaeological discovery has just proven that one of Jesus Christ’s most influential miracles that was recorded in the Gospel of John did indeed happen.

Back in 2005, sewage workers began doing maintenance work on pipes in the Old City of Jerusalem. They had no idea that they were about to find an artifact that most modern historians didn’t even think existed.

According to Mad World News, the workers found an unexpected freshwater reservoir, and they immediately called researchers in to study it. These researchers soon found that the reservoir was actually ancient Pool of Siloam, a place many believed was a myth.

Pool-of-Siloam-620x444

The Pool of Siloam is the site described in the Gospel of John where Jesus healed a blind man. According to John 9, Jesus spat in the dirt, rubbed the mud on the man’s eyes, and told him to go wash in the Pool of Siloam.  When the man did so, he could instantly see again.

“Scholars have said that there wasn’t a Pool of Siloam and that John was using a religious conceit” to illustrate a point, said New Testament scholar James H. Charlesworth of the Princeton Theological Seminary. “Now we have found the Pool of Siloam … exactly where John said it was.”

Scholars have now confirmed the reservoir is undoubtedly the same as the one described in the Bible, once again confirming the authenticity of the holy book.

Screen Shot 2016-02-16 at 12.25.41 PM

“The point is that it’s become increasingly clear that the default scholarly position of disbelieving the Bible because it is the Bible is untenable,” wrote author and speaker Eric Metaxas. “Of course, Christians should already know that. But it’s still gratifying to see that other people are able to see it, as well. Even if they have to go to the Pool of Siloam to do it.”

SHARE this story so that everyone can learn of this biblical discovery!

Leave a comment...

Want more stuff like this?

Add your email and your name and we'll send you the most interesting stories we get our hands on!

or

Sign-up with Facebook

By submitting above you agree to the TellMeNow privacy policy.