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1 week ago

Two friends bound by the dedication of service and life are now resting together at the Tahoma National Cemetery, even though their paths to get there were unorthodox.

Lt. Jim Louvier and First Lt. Bill Gray spent time in World War II fighting the Germans and serving their country. When all was said and done, Louvier returned home to the states while Gray did not. Gray’s plane crashed in 1945 and his remains were not found.

Family members learned that Army crews had been investigating another case when they came upon Gray’s crash site and his final resting place.

“The bones that they found were embedded in the tree,” Bradshaw said.

“It grew over his remains and really protected and marked the spot,” Louvier said.

Family members say Army crews nearby investigating another case stumbled upon Bill’s site after two witnesses of the crash decades ago alerted crews of what happened in Bill’s crash.

In 2016, crews started excavating the forested location, going through every inch of dirt looking for any clues. After 15 days of excavating, Bradshaw says, crews made the astounding discovery in the root of the tree.

Advances in science helped match Bill’s DNA to his two sisters allowing the war hero to finally come home on Wednesday.

Watch the video here:

Video Credit: Q13Fox

Gray’s remains have traveled home and have been laid to rest alongside his life-long friend.

You have to give kudos to the families that never gave up hoping they could bring the two together for one last time. Not only were these men friends before they were separated in the war, their families remained friends ever since.

This is a great story of dedication to share on your Facebook and Twitter timeline. Don’t forget to leave your opinions in the comment section below.

Source: Fox Q 13

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